Home

Romans 1 Commentary

Enduring Word Bible Commentary Romans Chapter

Romans 1 He preached in the same church as C. H. Spurgeon over one hundred years earlier. Yet most people today have never heard of John Gill. This is unfortunate, since his works contain priceless gems of information that are found nowhere except in the ancient writings of the Jews Verses 1-17 Romans 1:1. Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, separated unto the gospel of God, Paul has many titles, and he delights to mention them in writing to these Christians at Rome (Read all of Romans 1) Verse 1 Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, separated unto the gospel of God, Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ-To this introduction the conclusion answers, Romans 15:15, etc Chapter 1. In this chapter we may observe, I.The preface and introduction to the whole epistle, to v. 16.II. A description of the deplorable condition of the Gentile world, which begins the proof of the doctrine of justification by faith, here laid down at v. 17.The first is according to the then usual formality of a letter, but intermixed with very excellent and savoury expressions In May of 1738, a failed minister and missionary reluctantly went to a small Bible study where someone read aloud from Martin Luther's Commentary on Romans. As the failed missionary said later: While he was describing the change which God works in the heart through faith in Christ, I felt my heart strangely warmed

Romans 1 Commentary - Commentary Critical and Explanatory

Paul's letter to the *Romans. An EasyEnglish Bible Version and Commentary (2800 word vocabulary) on the Book of Romans. www.easyenglish.bible. Hilda Bright and Keith Simons. This commentary has been through Advanced Checking.. Words in boxes are from the Bible H ere is a Bible study, summary, and commentary for Romans 1: Romans 1:1-2 Paul, a servant of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle, set apart for the gospel of God, which he promised beforehand through his prophets in the holy Scriptures.. Paul typically gives his credentials at the very beginning of his letters (epistles) and this is no. Benson Commentary Romans 1:1-2. Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ — Though once a bitter persecutor; called to be an apostle — And made an apostle by that calling. The Greek, κλητος αποστολος, is literally, a called apostle, or an apostle called, namely, expressly, as the other apostles were

Biblical Commentary (Bible study) Romans 1:1-7 EXEGESIS: ROMANS 1:1-7. OVERVIEW Paul's opening to this letter to the church in Rome follows standard letter-writing conventions of the day with certain modifications. It was common for letters to begin with the name of the person writing the letter and th Romans 1, Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible, One of over 110 Bible commentaries freely available, this commentary, filling six volumes, provides an exhaustive look at every verse in the Bible Romans 1:19-20. Because that which may be known of God — Those great principles which are indispensably necessary to be known, such as his existence, his unity, his power, his wisdom, his goodness, and his righteous government of the world; is manifest in, or rather among, them — As ευ αυτοις should be here rendered: for God hath showed it to them — By the light which lightens. Rereading the thesis: Romans 1:16-17 in light of 1:1-7. By paying careful attention to vv. 1-7, we have put everything on the table we need to work our way through vv. 16-17. First, Paul says he is not ashamed of the gospel. We now know that the gospel of which he speaks is the announcement that David's heir has been raised from the dead and.

Jeremiah 29:11 - Best Bible Verse - Bible Verse Images

Biblical Commentary (Bible study) Romans 1:16-17; 3:22 EXEGESIS: ROMANS 1-3. THE CONTEXT Paul begins his letter to the Romans with a salutation (1:1-7) and a prayer of thanksgiving (1:8-15). It isn't until verse 16 that he finally gets to his main point. • Verses 16-17 (the first par View Romans 1. Commentaries for Romans Chapter 1 The apostle's commission. The doctrine of which the apostle Paul wrote, set forth the fulfilment of the promises by the prophets... View the entire commentary. Prays for the saints at Rome, and expresses his desire to see them Matthew Henry Bible Commentary (complete) In this chapter we may observe, I. The preface and introduction to the whole epistle, to v. 16. II. A description of the deplorable condition of the Gentile world, which begins the proof of the doctrine of justification by faith, here laid down at v. 17 Romans 5:1. Therefore being justified — In the way shown in the preceding chapter, we receive many blessed privileges and advantages in consequence thereof. Here, to comfort the believers at Rome, and elsewhere, under the sufferings which the profession of the gospel brought upon them, the apostle proceeds to enumerate the privileges which belong to true believers in general Romans 12:1. παρακαλῶ οὖν: the reference is to all that has been said since Romans 1:16, but especially to what more closely precedes. Cf. Ephesians 4:1, 1 Timothy 2:1, 1 Corinthians 4:16. The οὖν connects the two parts of the epistle, not formally but really, and shows the dependence of the practical upon the.

Romans 1:1. Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ The name of the author of this epistle is Paul, who formerly was called Saul. Some think his name was changed upon his own conversion; others, upon the conversion of the Roman deputy Sergius Paulus, ( Acts 13:7 Acts 13:9) ; others, that he was so called from the littleness of his stature; but rather it should seem that he had two names, which was. Romans 1 By: Charles Stanley From: On the Epistle to the Romans Paul, a bond servant of Jesus Christ. He was not a bond servant of any society or party, but of Jesus Christ. How few can follow Paul in these seven words, and yet how important it should be so, if service is to be acceptable to. Romans chapter 1. 1 Paul, a servant of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle and set apart for the gospel of God-- 2 the gospel he promised beforehand through his prophets in the Holy Scriptures 3 regarding his Son, who as to his earthly life was a descendant of David, 4 and who through the Spirit of holiness was appointed the Son of God in. Romans Chapter 1. Romans 1:1 Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ, called [to be] an apostle, separated unto the gospel of God, In this very first verse Paul introduces himself to the Roman Christians. Notice that Paul calls himself a servant of Jesus Christ Before we actually look at the details of Romans 1:1-7, a few things need to be pointed out. First, the actual introduction to Romans begins in 1:1 and ends in 1:17. This unit itself, however, can be broken down into three distinct, yet related sections. The first section is the salutation proper in 1:1-7

(Romans 1:1-7 NIV) At the heart of Paul's argument is this central personage: Jesus Christ, our Lord. That, certainly, is the theme of the epistle to the Romans, as it is the theme of all Paul's writings and all of the New Testament. Union in Christ is the central truth that God wants us to see Scripture Romans 1 Sort Bible Verse. Bible Verse; Newest; Oldest; Most Viewed; Most Shared; Sermon. The Author of the Greatest Letter Ever Written First in a Series of Messages on Romans. Apr 26, 1998. Scripture: Romans 1:1. John Piper Apr 26, 1998. Sermon. The Greatest Thing in the Worl The first sixteen verses of Paul's letter to the Romans are an introduction that concludes with a great statement by the apostle: I am not ashamed of the gospel of Jesus Christ for it is the power of God for salvation unto everyone who believes, to the Jew first and also to the Greek, for in it the righteousness of God is revealed from faith to faith, (Romans 1:16-17) As the Word Biblical Commentary: Romans 1-8 by James Dunn puts it, Paul's description of homosexuality is a characteristic expression of Jewish antipathy toward the practice of homosexuality so prevalent in the Greco Roman world. Therefore, Paul is not critiquing consensual, monogamous homosexual expression but, rather, the form it took. Romans 1:5-7. Faith and repentance go hand-in-hand. To turn to the Lord in faith is to turn away from trust in oneself and in one's own righteousness. Repentance is this turning, and it is a command of God in Scripture (Acts 17:30). As the flip side of repentance, faith is something that we are commanded to exercise as well

ESV Expository Commentary. Four New Testament scholars offer passage-by-passage commentary through the books of Romans, 1-2 Corinthians, and Galatians, explaining difficult doctrines, shedding light on overlooked sections, and applying them to life and ministry today. Part of the ESV Expository Commentary series Romans 1:1 Paul, a bond-servant of Christ Jesus, called as an apostle, set apart for the gospel of God, (NASB: Lockman). Greek: Paulos doulos Ch ristou Iesou, kletos apostolos, aphorismenos eis euaggelion Th eou,. Amplified: FROM PAUL, a bond servant of Jesus Christ (the Messiah) called to be an apostle, (a special messenger) set apart to [preach] the Gospel (good news) of and from God. Biblical Commentary (Bible study) Romans 5:1-11. EXEGESIS: ROMANS 5:1-2. WE HAVE PEACE WITH GOD. 1 Being therefore justified (Greek: dikaiothentes—from dikaioo) by faith, we have peace (Greek: eirenen) with God through our Lord Jesus Christ; 2 through whom we also have our access (Greek: prosagogen) by faith into this grace in which we stand. We rejoice in hope of the glory of God Romans 1:20 For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes, His eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly seen, being understood through what has been made, so that they are without excuse. (NASB: Lockman)Greek: ta gar aorata autou apo ktise os kosmou toi s poiemasin nooumena kathoratai, e te aidio s autou dunami s kai theiotes, ei s to einai autou s anapologetou Commentary on Romans 1:1-7. The opening of the letter to the Romans contains, in seven tightly packed verses, a summary of the themes that will be discussed in the rest of the letter. It describes who Paul is and how he gets his authority. It presents the content of the gospel and its implications for Paul's addressees, and it describes who.

Paul had never been to Rome when he wrote the letter to the Romans, though he had clearly expressed his desire to travel there in the near future (Acts 19:21; Romans 1:10-12). The apostle greeted twenty-six different people by name, personalizing a letter from a man who would have been a personal stranger to most of the recipients Romans 1:32 Illustrated. συνευδοκέω is a Greek term that means to agree with, give approval to.. It is found in the final verse of Romans 1 where Paul describes the final state of human sin, one in which mankind, knowing the just judgment of God against sin, not only still engaged in it, but gives hearty approval to those. Romans 1:21 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓] Romans 1:21, NIV: For although they knew God, they neither glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts were darkened. Romans 1:21, ESV: For although they knew God, they did not honor him as God or give thanks to him, but they became futile in their thinking, and their foolish. 29 See Douglas Moo, Romans 1-8, The Wycliffe Exegetical Commentary, ed. Kenneth Barker (Chicago: Moody, 1991), 112-113. 30 The noun unfaithful (ἀσυνθετος, asunthetos) occurs four times in Jer 3:7, 8, 10, 11. Cf. Ps 72:15: 77:57; 118:158 where the cognate verb ἀσυνθετει~ν occurs. Notice too the connection between.

Romans 1 Commentary - Matthew Henry Commentary on the

  1. Romans 1:18-3:20 found us guilty before the court of God's law, God's glory, and our conscience. Then Paul explained how because of what Jesus did, the righteousness of God is given to all who believe. The guilty sentence is transformed into a sentence of justified, and justified by faith. b
  2. Romans 10 - Israel's Present Rejection of God A. Israel's rejection of the gospel of salvation through Jesus Christ. 1. (1-3) Israel's refusal to submit to the righteousness of God. Brethren, my heart's desire and prayer to God for Israel is that they may be saved
  3. Romans 1:1 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓] Romans 1:1, NIV: Paul, a servant of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle and set apart for the gospel of God-- Romans 1:1, ESV: Paul, a servant of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle, set apart for the gospel of God, Romans 1:1, KJV: Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, separated unto the gospel of God
  4. Footnotes. Romans 1:3 Or who according to the flesh; Romans 1:4 Or was declared with power to be the Son of God; Romans 1:5 Or that is; Romans 1:13 The Greek word for brothers and sisters (adelphoi) refers here to believers, both men and women, as part of God's family; also in 7:1, 4; 8:12, 29; 10:1; 11:25; 12:1; 15:14, 30; 16:14, 17.; Romans 1:17 Or is from faith to fait

Romans 1-8 Commentary. Romans 1-8. Commentary. John MacArthur takes the reader through an expositional study of the first eight chapters of the book of Romans as recorded by Paul the apostle. MacArthur addresses Paul's record of the good news of the gospel to the security of the believer in Christ BIBLE STUDY COMMENTARY ON ROMANS - CHAPTER 1. BIBLE STUDY COMMENTARY. ON ROMANS - CHAPTER 1. PART 2. ROMANS 1:16-32. HAVING concluded his prefatory address, the Apostle now announces, in brief but comprehensive terms, the grand subject which occupies the first five chapters of this Epistle, namely, the doctrine of justification by faith Greeting. 1 Paul, a bondservant of Jesus Christ, () called to be an apostle, () separated to the gospel of God 2 which He promised before () through His prophets in the Holy Scriptures, 3 concerning His Son Jesus Christ our Lord, who [] was () born of the seed of David according to the flesh, 4 and declared to be the Son of God with power according () to the Spirit of holiness, by the.

The Psalms – The Bridge Church

Romans 1 Bible Commentary - Matthew Henry (concise

Romans 1-8 MacArthur New Testament Commentary (Volume 15) (MacArthur New Testament Commentary Series) Hardcover - April 9, 1991 by John MacArthur (Author) 4.9 out of 5 stars 164 rating Commentary on Romans by John Calvin. This document has been generated from XSL (Extensible Stylesheet Language) source with RenderX XEP Formatter, version 3.7.3 Client Academic Romans 8 - A New and Wonderful Life in the Spirit A. Life in the Spirit contrasted with life in the flesh. 1. (1) No condemnation. There is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus, who do not walk according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit.. a. There is therefore now no condemnation: The simple declaration of no condemnation comes to those who are in Christ Jesus

Biblical Commentary (Bible study) Romans 12:1-2. EXEGESIS: ROMANS 12:1-2. PRESENT YOUR BODIES A LIVING SACRIFICE. 1 Therefore I urge you, brothers, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable (Greek: euareston—well-pleasing) to God, which is your spiritual (Greek: logiken—rational, genuine, true) service (Greek: latreian—service) Romans 1:1-32. Submitted by admin on Thu, 2009-02-12 18:20. The apostle Paul identified himself as the writer of the letter to the Romans. (1:1) In view of his apostleship to the Gentiles, he may have chosen to go by his Roman name Paul.. His Hebrew name Saul had the proud distinction of having been the name of Israel's first king.

Romans 1 - Coffman Commentaries on the Bible - Bible

Commentary on Romans 6:1,2 (Read Romans 6:1,2) The apostle is very full in pressing the necessity of holiness. He does not explain away the free grace of the gospel, but he shows that connexion between justification and holiness are inseparable. Let the thought be abhorred, of continuing in sin that grace may abound Romans 7 - Exposing the Weakness of the Law A. Dead to the Law. 1. (1-3) The law has authority only over the living. Or do you not know, brethren (for I speak to those who know the law), that the law has dominion over a man as long as he lives? For the woman who has a husband is bound by the law to her husband as long as he lives Romans chapter 1 KJV (King James Version) 1 Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, separated unto the gospel of God,. 2 (Which he had promised afore by his prophets in the holy scriptures,). 3 Concerning his Son Jesus Christ our Lord, which was made of the seed of David according to the flesh;. 4 And declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the spirit of. Living the Christian Life. A. The foundation for Christian living. J.B. Phillips has an outstanding and memorable translation of Romans 12:1-2: . With eyes wide open to the mercies of God, I beg you, my brothers, as an act of intelligent worship, to give Him your bodies, as a living sacrifice, consecrated to Him and acceptable by Him 1 Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, separated unto the gospel of God, 2 (Which he had promised afore by his prophets in the holy scriptures,) 3 Concerning his Son Jesus Christ our Lord, which was made of the seed of David according to the flesh; 4 And declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead

68 best images about Book of PHILIPPIANS on Pinterest1 Samuel 2:2 Inspirational Image

Romans 1 Commentary - John Gill's Exposition of the Bibl

Romans Commentary Verse by Verse. Romans 1:1-4 Commentary. Romans 1:5-7 Commentary. Romans 1:8-10 Commentary. Romans 1:11-15 Commentary. Romans 1:16-17 Commentary. Romans 1:18-19 Commentary. Romans 1:20-21 Commentary. Romans 1:22-23 Commentary The commentary on Romans by James Dunn is detailed and scholarly, as are many of the commentaries in the Word Biblical Commentary series. While the layperson will be able to benefit from it, much of what is found between the covers of this volume will be primarily of interest to the scholar

Romans 1 Commentary - Spurgeon's Verse Expositions of the

Sponsored link. Overview of Romans 1:18-32: . The key passage from this section of Paul's writing reads (in the King James Version):. Romans 1:26-27: For this cause God gave them up unto vile affections: for even their women did change the natural use into that which is against nature: And likewise also the men, leaving the natural use of the woman, burned in their lust one toward another. If we take those figures from Jesus' parable, Paul spoke to the Publican in Romans 1 and now he addresses the Pharisee (Luke 18:10-14). ii. Many among the Jewish people of Paul's day typified the moralist; but his words in Romans 2:1-16 seem to have a wider application. For example, there was Seneca, the Roman politician, moral teacher and. Romans 1 lesson by Dr. Bob Utley, retired professor of hermeneutics (Bible interpretation). Recorded at the Bible Lessons International studio #1. Recognize that all of you belongs to God anyway, and Daring to Submit to Him is for your good and pleases God. We get this from Romans 12:1. Presenting our bodies means to present the totality of our life and activities to Him. Our bodies live out who we are inside. Paul says this is our reasonable act of worship. What he means is Duh Romans 12:1-2 - Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God's mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship. Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God's will is—his good, pleasing and perfect will

Romans 1 Bible Commentary - Wesley's Explanatory Note

A Commentary on Romans 13 Romans 13:1-7: An Interpolation? Virtually every serious commentary on the book of Romans has had to wrestle with the integrity of the last two chapters of the work, especially chapter 16. 1 But, this is not the only place in the epistle where Pauline authenticity has been questioned Commentary on Romans 5:1-5. In the space of five verses, the second reading for Trinity Sunday mentions God, Christ, and the Holy Spirit. We have peace with God (verse 1). This peace, as well as access to grace, has come through Jesus Christ (verse 2). Moreover, God's love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit (verse 5) Biblical Commentary (Bible study) Romans 12:1-8. EXEGESIS: ROMANS 12:1-2. PRESENT YOUR BODIES A LIVING SACRIFICE. 1 Therefore I urge you, brothers, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable (Greek: euareston—well-pleasing) to God, which is your spiritual (Greek: logiken—rational, genuine, true) service (Greek: latreian—service)

India’s Ancient Maritime History - Part 2ICD - Piracy - Asser InstituteNAZARENE ISRAEL FAITH, TORAH TREASURE TROVE - NETZARIM

Romans 5:1 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓] Romans 5:1, NIV: Therefore, since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, Romans 5:1, ESV: Therefore, since we have been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. Romans 5:1, KJV: Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord. Romans 8 Commentary. By Home 23 February, 2021 Romans Commentary List 0 Comments. Victory through the Spirit (8:1-17) The reason believers can have victory through Christ is that the power of the indwelling Spirit of Christ is greater than the power of the old sinful nature. The downward pull of the sinful nature may be likened to the downward. Martin Luther was born to Hans Luder (or Ludher, later Luther) and his wife Margarethe (née Lindemann) on 10 November 1483 in Eisleben, County of Mansfeld in the Holy Roman Empire.Luther was baptized the next morning on the feast day of St. Martin of Tours.His family moved to Mansfeld in 1484, where his father was a leaseholder of copper mines and smelters and served as one of four citizen. Romans 1: A Concise Commentary* Romans 1: A Concise Commentary* November 1, 2019 by Zane Hodges in Grace in Focus Articles *The following is a condensed version of the full-length commenty by Hodges on Romans. This will be part of the new one-volume Grace New Testament Commentary, due in December